Swinger moms in Sugar Creek Twp Indiana

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Union Township Bios. His father was a Virginian by birth, and at an early age migrated with the family to the State of Tennessee, locating in the Sewannee valley, where he resided for twenty years, and where a large of descendants of the family still reside. He subsequently came to Kentucky, and thence to Charleston, in the then Territory of Indiana. When the " Prophet's war" broke out, he ed the forces commanded by Gen. William Henry Harrison, as a volunteer, and remained in service through the entire campaign, being engaged in the memorable battle of Tippecanoe.

After this battle he served for two years as a dragoon scout, until the hostilities between the Wabash tribes and the whites were finally settled. Returning home to Charlestown he made preparations and removed to Indianapolis, of which city he was one of the earliest settlers. In the autumn of he finally removed to Montgomery county, settling on a tract two and a half miles southwest of Crawfordsville, on Offiel's creek, where he engaged in farming.

The son was left fatherless when he was about eleven years old, and the family estate having been dissipated by the speculation of its administrator, the mother and boy were compelled to struggle with the severest adversity. He thus assumed the burdens of life while yet in childhood, and bore them unflinchingly and without complaint until the wheel of fortune returned a reward.

He entered the preparatory school of Wabash College in with a determination to obtain a thorough education if nothing else should ever be secured, and after six years was graduated from the classical course with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Soon following his graduation he received an appointment as deputy clerk of Clinton county, and removed to Frankfort.

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There, snatching fragments of time from the toils of his office, he began the study of law, and in a few years was enabled to attend the law school connected with the University of Indiana at Bloomington, where he was placed under the instruction of Hon.

Graduating at the end of one year, he returned to Frankfort and engaged in the active duties of his chosen profession. In he was married to Harriet D. Janney, a descendant of a prominent Quaker family of Virginia, whose paternal ancestors were the Porters of Pennsylvania, and whose maternal ancestors were the Ruples and Judahs of Basle, Switzerland. After their marriage Mr. Cowan formed a law partnership with Hon. James F. Suit, at Frankfort. Suit was one of the most distinguished advocates of western Indiana, and his talents being supplemented by the energy and studious habits of his partner, their business rapidly became lucrative.

In Mr. Cowan was nominated for the judgeship in the eighth judicial circuit, composed of the counties of Boone, Clinton, Montgomery, Parke, Vermilion, Fountain, and Warren. His competitor was an experienced and able jurist, at the time, on the bench of the circuit, and the political complexion of the counties composing the judicial field was decidedly hostile to his being retired; notwithstanding which, Mr.

Cowan's personal popularity, and reputation as a lawyer, gave him the election by a large majority. The term for which he was elected was six years, which were rounded up with the severest and most exacting mental labor. At the expiration of the term he stood so high in popular esteem that he was unanimously renominated by his party and again elected for a similar term without any real opposition from the opposite political party.

Completing his labors upon the bench in he returned to the practice of law at Crawfordsville, where he had removed his family informing a partnership with Hon. Thomas M. Patterson, late member of congress from Colorado. At the end of a prosperous connection of two years he became associated with Hon. White, and his second son, James E. Cowan, in a new legal firm, which continued for nearly three years, when he finally retired from practice and connected himself with the First National Bank of Crawfordsville, as assistant cashier, which position he still holds.

As is usual with descendants of Scotch ancestry, he, with his family, are adherents of the Presbyterian church. Three sons and one daughter were born to him, all of whom are living and grown to maturity. In person Judge Cowan is tall, slenderly built, of nervous - sanguine temperament, erect carriage and figure, with an air of modest indignity's.

His disposition is genial, and he delights to meet his friends, :or whom and his family he has strong affection. His long and toilsome life has produced a competence with which comfort and serenity are assured to his old age. His wife lives to enjoy with him and their children the fruits of mutual sacrifices and well earned honors.

Francis C. Cope was born in Cumberland county,Pennsylvania, January 19, Her mother and father were members of the United Brethren church, and he was in the war of In they moved to Montgomery county, Ohio. She was married and came to this county in Her husband was S. Cope; he died September 9, Cope was a farmer, a Lutheran, a republican, and one Swinger moms in Sugar Creek Twp Indiana the early settlers in this county. He was a good citizen and an honest, hard working man.

Both of his grandfathers were captains in the revolutionary war. Swinger moms in Sugar Creek Twp Indiana is a Christian lady and very liberal and benevolent. She has about acres, and lives near the city. Stephen A. Stilwell, deputy city treasurer, Crawfordsville, was born in Montgomery county March 22, on a farm near Crawfordsville. His father, Jeremiah Stilwell, came from Kentucky and settled in this county inand assisted in laying out the city of Crawfordsville. He is still living, at an advanced age, an honored and highly respected citizen.

His mother's name was Didama. He lived upon a farm until he was twenty-three years of age, and obtained such an education as might be obtained at the district school. When the call was issued asking for brave men to defend our country Mr. Stilwell enlisted in company C, 40th Ind. For three years he served his country and was then mustered out. He again enlisted and gallantly fought until the struggle closed, coming home as captain, given him as a reward for his courage, participating in Bowling Green, Perrysville, and Crab Orchard.

Ambrose Whitlock, Esq. He had been gradually wearing away for months; vet such was the tenacity of his iron constitution, hardened by habitual temperance, and exercise in the open air, that on the eve of his departure he appeared as though he might survive many days longer, even weeks and months.

On the morning of his death he requested to be carried out in his chair that he might once more enjoy his favorite seat in summer under the shade of a tree on the lawn which had been planted by his own hand, and had become in size one of the monarchs of the forest. He had been seated only a few minutes when he was observed by the attendants to have closed his eyes, as if in a doze, and on approaching him they found the vital spark extinct.

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Whitlock was born in the then colony of Virginia, in May He entered the army of the United States in as a private soldier, and by his merits soon rose from the ranks and was commissioned an officer in one of the regiments of infantry. He assisted in the erection of Fort Washington, now the city of Cincinnati, at which time the only dwellings in that western commercial emporium were a few log cabins. In he served as a soldier in the army commanded by Gen. He served under Gen.

Wayne in his expedition against the Indians in It was during this campaign that he assisted in the building of Fort Wayne, where he was stationed for some time. Having risen to the rank of captain he was stationed at Fort Massac, Illinois, on the lower Ohio, and at other places in the southwest, and served with that part of the army which constructed the great military road from Tennessee through the Choctaw and Cherokee countries to Louisiana.

Under the administration of President Jefferson he was appointed paymaster, with the rank of major of the United States army, in the western and southwestern departments. While officiating in this capacity he carried his funds in keel-boats to the military stations on the Mississippi, Ohio and Wabash rivers, amid the dark domains of savage life, the boats being propelled by soldiers, who also acted as a guard; and on horseback over the vast prairies of Illinois, and through the forests of Indiana.

In this hazardous employment hundreds of thousands of dollars passed through his hands to the soldiers without the loss or the misapplication of a cent. At the memorable interview between Gen. Harrison and Tecumseh, at Vincennes, inMaj. Whitlock was present, and his of that affair puts a very different face upon the transaction than what has been usually delineated. After the termination of the war ofsomewhere aboutMaj. Whitlock retired from the army to civil life, and in was appointed receiver of public money in the land office, which, by the direction of the Hon.

William H. Crawford, the secretary of the treasury, he located at the place which he called Crawfordsville, after the name of the distinguished secretary, who was his personal and political Swinger moms in Sugar Creek Twp Indiana. While he officiated as receiver a portion only of the paper currency of the country, for several years, was receivable at the land office, and sometimes those who went to enter land would be deficient a few dollars in land office money to pay for the land selected; in such instances Maj. Whitlock would give them receipts in full, and trust them for the amount of the then current money.

If they offered to give their notes he refused to receive them, saying: "If you are honest you will pay me without giving your notes, and if you are dishonest you will not pay if you do give your notes. Whit- lock was, in all his relations and doings, a man of unbending integrity.

He was so from an innate sense of right and justice, as he was in subsequent life from Christian principle. He never knowingly wronged any man, and he was scrupulously just and upright in his dealings with the government as in his private business transactions. An instance of this, and at the same time of his outspoken western manner, occurred in Washington City under the administration of President Monroe.

He went to the proper office in the treasury department to have his s audited. He knew it to be an error, and so told the clerks, adding: " You don't know how to keep books here. This act carries with it its own comment.

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Whitlock was a sincere, unostentatious Christian, and exemplified his faith by a consistent life and conversation. He was a liberal contributor to the parish of St. John's church, Crawfordsville, of which for many years he was the senior church warden, donating the commodious lot on which the church stands, and gave, it is believed, the larger part of the money expended in its erection and subsequent renovation.

He was a devout attendant on the services of the church as long as his failing strength and increasing infirmities would allow. He died in full communion, departing in "'a reasonable, religious and holy hope of resurrection unto eternal life," through the atoning merits of the Saviour, in whom he put all his trust and confidence, and whom for many long years he had endeavored to serve " with a pure heart, fervently," striving in all things to maintain "a conscience void of offense toward God and toward man.

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Galey deceased was born August 31,in Shelby county, Kentucky, and received but a limited education. He learned the tailoring trade, and in came to Montgomery county and settled near Waveland, keeping a tailor shop untilthen moved to Crawfordsville and carried on his trade. In he engaged in farming the land, a part of which is now Oak Hill cemetery.

Galey retired from active labor and lived in Crawfordsville until death, which occurred in He was an early whig and later a stalwart republican, but never sought office. He was an intimate friend of Got. Lane, and at the time when the latter ran for congress Mr. Galey aided materially in canvassing the district in his favor and republicanism.

He sent two sons to the civil war, was a member of the Presbyterian church, a man of strict integrity and who stood high in his community. He was married to Lucy Wilhite, sister to the Wilhite brothers, of Crawfordsville. His family was always large, made so by the of poor people he continually aided and children he raised.

His sons, Beal V. Beal V. Galey, son of W. Milton H. George D. Hurleywere born on the same spot. Galey attended the county seminary, and also a short time at Wabash College. In he began the study of dentistry in the office of Dr. Canine, with whom he studied three years, becoming associated for a short time with the doctor.

Inin conjunction with his brother, Milton H. Lee, of Crawfordsville. They have three children, Mabel, Virgil, and Maud. Galey are members of the Methodist church.

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He is solidly republican. Galey was born September 14, His education was gained partly at Wabash College, but mostly in the county seminary. Galey was enrolled as a volunteer to aid in suppressing the rebellion.

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On Monday, the next day, he started for Indianapolis, where he was mustered in. He was first sent to Cumberland, Maryland, where he staid some time, then went to Harper's Ferry, and from there he came borne. He was afterward stationed at Louisville, where he studied dentistry with Drs. McClelland and Canine.

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